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Oil-Rich Norway is the Land of Renewable Energy and Electric Vehicles

renewable energy

Norway is the place for Renewable Energy, clean air and a green paradise without smokestacks, tailpipes and smoke pollution.

The country’s five million citizens have incentives when it come to electricity renewables and electric car sales.

Norway can be compared to Australia in terms of large fossil fuel resources like gas and oil, which are considered as the determinant of a nation’s wealth and prosperity. This country is also rich in legendary coal reserves.

The only difference between the two countries is seen in the attitude and way the future and long-term goals are planned.

Despite getting a surplus of energy, the Norwegians are adding more wind power to their energy sources as the country has been able to make 125 TWh of Renewable Energy every year and has used 115 TWh. It is more than likely that a new trend related to solar energy is probably in the works as promises of lower solar cost is highly anticipated.

Furthermore, the March sales has simply exalted for Tesla Mode S. This is most probably due to generous incentives for Electric vehicles, like priority driving lanes and exemption for the steep taxes.

Even so, Norway is an oil-rich country so the boom in electric car sales is astonishing. Back in 2001, Norway’s oil production garnered 3.4 million barrels. Recently, this number has been cut in half but that didn’t stop Norway from using what they have from the oil revenue and has chosen to dabble in the Electric vehicles usage.

In Australia, it seems that the government is intent on using and degrading the country’s fossil fuels. In contrast to Norway, Australia has not made a big deal our of former energy minister getting a job as a fossil fuel industry lobbyist, a big no-no if it has been done in other countries due to possibility of personal gain.

Unlike Norway, Australia is never fond of promoting electric cars as the country only promotes eco innovations, like the green car fund for Holden to invent a V8 engine that can turn off all four cylinders to save on fuel. More so, burning coals is better advocated than usage of electricity-powered cars.

It is only obvious that Australia should follow the lead of Norway when it comes to renewable richness and prosperity over a long-term. It should be clear that the usage of electrified cars is the way to go.

With the automotive industry given a lowered morale booster, after a shortfall or lack of foresight, there is nothing to be lost from giving incentives to owners. Although the choice is clear like crystal, there is always the option to choose whether the country should follow Norway’s example of be beaten by tradition and settle for a less better option of letting the country decrease its natural fossil fuel.

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